Taking My Own Advice

A friend recently emailed me about feeling stressed and asked for advice. I usually hate giving advice—people often take it wrong and blame you for the results. But I knew I could do it in this case.

My advice boiled down to prioritizing the various elements in our lives. We’ve only got 24 hours in a day—we can’t change that. So how do we juggle work, family, friends, hobbies, household chores, school, and everything else? We have to realize we can’t do everything all the time. So we have to prioritize.

But as I wrote my email response, I knew the advice applied as much to me as the friend.

You see, I’m trying to make a better schedule for myself. And that means ranking the various parts of my life and focusing as much as possible on the important people and things. Family time is most important. Sleep and work also a given. Although I work part-time and I’ve had a lighter stretch for a couple of months, things will get busier later this month or early next. The hours will increase.

Next on the list is writing. I have two novels beyond the first draft stage. I have sequels for both of them that are lagging. Something has taken a lot of time away from them. What is it? I’m sure you’ve already guessed. You’re reading it.

The Blog. It’s a wonderful thing. I get to interact with wonderful people like you. But I’ve pressured myself to do more than I originally intended because I want to provide interesting and fun content. If my books are ever published in a traditional format, I want my agent to say “Hey, great blog!” But it has seriously cut into my writing/editing time.

Reading other blogs also takes time. And I like to comment as often as I can on a core group that I follow. (You know who you are 🙂 ) But I’ve got to admit that I can’t do it consistently for all the blogs I follow. I shouldn’t let that get to me. I know lots of my followers don’t leave comments or likes very often—probably because they’re busy with their lives, too. They’ve probably done a better job of prioritizing than I have.

So as I revise my priorities and schedule, some things have to change.  And one of those changes will be dropping down to two posts per week, starting today. My recent posting schedule change in February was only a change of days, not frequency. My posting days will be Saturday and Tuesday. I’m dropping Thursday.

This was not an easy decision to make. I’m as addicted to my stats as anyone else. I love to see those views go up each day—I passed 4,000 views last weekend. And it only got more addicting when WordPress added the world map showing where the views are coming from. The US, Great Britain, Saudi Arabia, Australia, Latvia, Serbia, and so many other places…. Awesome! All of my known ancestral countries/areas are represented except one—Ireland. People in Serbia, Greece, the Czech Republic, Great Britain, France, Germany, and the Netherlands have all visited.

But the novels have to take higher priority, and the blog posts have to drop down to a more sustainable level for me. So Saturday posts will continue to be more content-oriented, such as those I’ve done on writer’s block, the role of minor characters, and preparing for luck. Tuesday posts will be more creative—Poetic Archaeology will return, there might be more short stories, and I’m still working on a list of fun and interesting archaeology sites—things like that.

I hope you’ll all stick with me. Honestly, I think fewer weekly posts will help me keep the content quality higher. I know my site views will decrease, at least in the short-term. I’m sure I’ll have withdrawal symptoms. Maybe new people will continue to find me and start following the blog. I hope so. But what I hope first and foremost is to publish good, enjoyable novels. And I have to finish them first.

Now where’s that schedule I’m trying to create….

70 thoughts on “Taking My Own Advice

  1. Yes, I can relate to that. The only reason I can keep up my postings right now is because I’m rolling over next novel ideas before I get “sunk into” my next one. The Blog has helped me get some short term satisfaction in the meantime. So nice! But I think we all struggle with priorities… there are never enough hours in the day.

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    • Right now I’ve got both novels out with different readers. And I want to use this time to think about their sequels and to write short backstories about “Death Out of Time,” which is the one with the best shot at a traditional publishing deal. Ultimately, I’d like to put those backstories on my future website as extra materials for people who enjoy the book. Or they could lead to a collection of short stories related to the series….

      I’d certainly take more hours in the day. But I also know I could be using the existing ones more productively!

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  2. You posted on a subject very much on my mind lately. I should be spending far more time on my creative writing than I am. I’ve already decided to stick with two posts a week. I need to be more disciplined on my blog reading as well. There are so many I want to follow–and new ones come my way everyday. Plus, I really enjoy the interaction. But I can see that I need to set some ground rules for myself. Just haven’t got there yet.

    Thanks for posting on a subject I’m sure many of us have thought about. Now, go write! We will be here whether you post three, two, or one times per week. 🙂

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    • I think you were wise not to try to do more. Two should be manageable and let me continue to visit and interact with blogs like yours. It’s tempting to follow everyone who follows me, but I know I can’t realistically do it. And it’s easier for me to keep up with bloggers who DON”T post everyday. That’s probably not what WordPress wants to hear! 😉

      I have been writing today! For the first time in ages, I got more than 1,000 words done. And I plan on doing some more later this evening. And I like that feeling. 🙂 It’s good to feel the ideas getting through my fingers again.

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      • Good for you. Your post made me put more serious thought into my time budgeting. I’ve decided that instead of getting my social networking done first, and then moving onto my writing (which is what I’ve been doing), I’m going to start with my writing. THEN I’ll move onto the social networking. That way, if I run out of time, I won’t be sacrificing my writing. We’ll see how long that lasts. 🙂

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        • Hmm, now I’ll have Twitter, Facebook, AND WordPress blacklisting me for encouraging people to do other things first! 🙂 It’s a good thing I know none of my posts are of the type that get “Freshly Pressed,” so I won’t be disappointed there 🙂

          Mornings are my best time for writing. They’re also my best time for “day job” work. But I think I can find a good balance that takes me through the day. And, yes, we’ll see how long I can keep up the schedule, too!

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  3. oh jm! We are on the same wavelength, only I didn’t post anything about my doings. I know what you mean. I look at my stats too and think ‘they like me!’ and I try to return every visit to every single follower and then realize the time that has gone by. I probably lose more than half my allotted writing time to the blog. I am on this blog more than I’m writing–and that wasn’t the plan. Then I end up posting extra things that I had no intention of doing at all–more time gone. Maybe I should take your advice too. 😉 I think I will…

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    • It’s such a catch-22 situation. I keep telling myself “quality over quantity,” and “you want to be a successful author, not the world’s most popular blogger.” But I see those numbers go up….

      But as I just mentioned in the previous comment, it’s been my first 1,000+ word day in quite a while. And I’ve got the ideas that will add at least another 500 words this evening. Those are the things I need to focus on!

      Better structuring of my time should let me get more done on writing, and following other bloggers more evenly.

      And if I’m lucky, it won’t be long before I’ll have a novel or two that all of you can read if you’re so inclined. 🙂

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      • Well, you saw I ended up making a post about blogging after all! Oh the withdrawal pains!! I’m hoping for better writing time and who knows what else the future holds? Having slept on it, I feel I made the right choice for me. And I hope you are putting your new found time towards you most heartfelt goals and dreams. I’m excited for you about your WIP! When they are published I’ll be one of the first in line! See you next Sunday 🙂

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  4. I totally agree with you on prioritizing things, and that the writing has to come before the blog. The stats are nice, and I tend to feel a little guilty when I get to 3 days and no post from me, but the writing has to come first for me too, and I’m always hopeful that my own followers will be understanding and agree. I can tell you that I will still be here, even if you post less often, especially if it’s because you’re too busy writing books 🙂

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    • If I could come close to your recent daily word counts, I’d probably have four novels out with readers right now! 🙂

      And thank you for sticking with me—I think fewer posts will help me keep mine fresher and more entertaining/interesting. I’m trying to at least follow the standard blogging advice of consistent posting days. But this writer cannot imagine posting fresh and vibrant content everyday. I admire the writers who can, but I have to face the reality of my situation.

      (And, yes, on this rainy weekend, you can bet I’ll writing later this evening when my husband is watching TV!)

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      • You know, I know you’re right about my daily word counts, and I know I’m becoming neurotic about expecting too much from myself. I have to work on that.
        I guess, as far as blog post frequency goes, I tend to break the rules, but I said on my About Me page that I would post at least twice a week, but never said which days. I don’t always have something to say on a Tuesday, so I prefer to go with whatever days I do have something to say.
        Yay for you writing! Rainy weekends, a frequent occurrence here, are fabulous for enforcing some writing time. 🙂

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        • I think as long as people have an idea when to find us, they don’t mind a little variation—especially when a simple thing like signing up for email notices of new posts is an option.

          We’ve had absolutely beautiful weather here in the Mid-Atlantic for a while, so I shouldn’t complain about one rainy weekend. 🙂 And I am enjoying the writing time again. 🙂

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  5. Pingback: Eyes Wide Open « The Writernubbin

    • WordPress will probably hate me for saying this, but it’s easier for me to keep up when people don’t blog as much! But I don’t think I’m the only person who feels that way. I’ll enjoy your posts just as much if they’re only a couple times a week. 🙂

      Actually, I’ll sound a little old-fashioned here. I’ll probably enjoy them more BECAUSE they’re not an everyday thing. It makes them more special that way.

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  6. I think that you are wise to identify the need to schedule. Since I have started blogging I have found myself using it to tempt me away from my work. This is fine if I keep to my timescale. When I was at work I was very organized and I guess one of the lovely things about being self employed as a writer is that ability to do one’s job whenever the mood takes. However as you say it does take discipline and with so many distractions we must be strong. I still look forward to reading your blog and hope that it doesn’t lose you too many followers.

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    • Being disciplined has been part of the problem recently. I work part-time, and most days I telework. It’s easy to lose track of time and not be as productive with my non-work time as I would be on a 9-to-5 schedule. That’s part of my reasoning for setting more scheduled time.

      I hope followers will find that the content quality will be higher as I post a little less frequently. Maybe I’m not the average blog reader, but I’d rather read fewer interesting posts by a blogger than lots of stuff that I just pass over without liking or commenting on.

      If I do lose some followers, well, I understand. But I hope most will prefer the fewer, but tastier bites!

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  7. Oh, I hear you. My work life is really stressful lately, and it’s just so much easier to slap together a blog post than it is to start editing a novel.

    Prioritizing is good. You speak the truth.

    Good luck!

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    • I wonder if WordPress would agree?! 😉 But blogging does not get the novel finished or edited! In this market, we need to do both. But the published novel is the main goal, even if it is so much harder to finish.

      This might have been easier if we were trying to get published in the 1960s. But the reality of 2012 is so much harder!

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  8. I agree. I should be looking for an agent, polishing my query letter, and working on my next novel rather that spending so much time on blogging and reading other blogs. But everyone has so much interesting stuff to write about! Glad I found your blog link from Jeannie. I’m going to take a page from your “book.”

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    • Hi, Robin, thanks for the follow! I will hopefully now have more time to keep up with blogs, both existing and new for me.

      And hopefully after this review round for “Death Out of Time,” I’ll be polishing the final draft and working on the query and synopsis for it. The time spent on that is so important if we’re going to succeed in finding an agent for the traditional publishing route. Fortunately, only two posts a week from me should not keep you from the task. 🙂

      I will be checking out your blog soon!

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  9. Definitely get those books rolling off the presses…that’s priority 1 after family! I’m really looking forward to reading them! In the meantime, I guarantee everyone who follows you will look forward to your twice weekly blog updates!

    ps. have you ever heard of (or seen) a British tv series from a few years back, called “Bonekickers”? If not, do a google for it to check it out. I envision you as the lead character in that series!

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    • Hmm, I googled the show since I hadn’t heard of it before. The premise sounds interesting, but it sounds like the reviews weren’t all that good. Most “real” archaeologists don’t like fictional portrayals of the field because they’re not “realistic.” Well, most people (myself included) watch movies and read books to be entertained, not to get a degree in a field like archaeology!

      I’m trying to find a good balance, by incorporating more realistic elements for Madeleine and Katharine in both books. But they’re also getting to do some atypical adventurous things. They wouldn’t be very entertaining stories if the two women only did “real” archaeology. 😉 Hey, I’d LOVE to find a dead time traveler and his equipment on a site! But I’m going to have to settle for writing a novel about it, I think.

      And speaking of writing, it’s time to visit more of the backstories for these folks….

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  10. Gosh, JM, you took the words right outta my mouth. I post once a week for my personal blog, and once a week for Limebird. Trying to keep up with those posts and the comments and maintain relationships with 90+ blogs that I follow has me rethinking my situation.

    I, like you, have found a core group within the blogs I follow with whom I try really hard to stay up-to-date. But I’m discovering I will spend close to three hours a day doing that. I try not to just ‘like’ a post, I try to add something of quality. But it adds up to 2-3 hours! That’s time I need to be spending on my manuscript that keeps getting turned down, right?

    But we are in a fix, aren’t we? Because half of publication is marketing, part of what helps sell a book is how we do in social media.

    There has to be a happy medium. I was trying to figure if I force myself to only comment on 5 blogs per day, that I’d cut down my time to about 1 hour a day. However, it means I’d miss a huge number of posts that people put up. And with 90 or so blogs that I follow, it would mean I would be visiting the same blog less than once a week, probably only twice a month!

    I don’t know. Something has to give, and I wish I could find a better answer. So, that’s my long response to saying, yes, I know what you’re going through and I totally understand why you are making this decision.

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    • I go back and forth on the “like” button. Sometimes it does feel like taking the easy way out. But I also don’t mind when people leave a “like” on my posts without commenting. My image of them is that they’re busy and don’t have time to comment, but they’re showing support for my blog.

      So at times I try to think that’s how I should feel about myself and leaving “likes.” Of course, it rarely works. I thinkI should do more. That being said, I’m more likely to leave “likes” and not comments for followers who don’t comment on my posts. And my recent scheduling difficulties have led me to not comment as much on newer blogs that I follow. I’m still searching for that good balance.

      If you find that happy medium, you should bottle it and sell it to the blogging community—you could make a fortune! Until then, I’ll have to tackle my recent mental laziness with my new, stricter schedule. The sneaky truth in my case is that I could do a better job of juggling life’s events if I could do a better job of focusing. I’ve gotten my body in shape—now I have to instill the same discipline on my brain.

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  11. JM, I’m with you! I ❤ your blog and will enjoy every post you have time for. I agree that blogging takes up a good amount of time. For me, it's the reading and commenting on other blogs that got out of control. I'm trying to keep it to 1 hour every day. But it's hard. I have some terrific blogging friends and I want to keep up on everything they are posting. But fundamentally, the writing is the most important thing. I totally support your decision! Great prioritizing!

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    • It’s reassuring to see I’m not the only writer feeling overwhelmed by the social media frenzy. But as Kate noted just above you, marketing is so important for us—moreso, I think, than it would’ve been even 10 years ago. How do we accomplish it successfully without sacrificing other important parts of our lives? That’s true, of course, in so many ways, for everyone. Can we climb the ladder at work without losing the spouse and kids?

      Yes, that reading and commenting takes so much time. Honestly, I find it easier when a blogger doesn’t post everyday. I’m more likely to be able to keep up and leave better comments. I also think it leads to better discussions on the posts and between the followers. Others might disagree.

      But I will always make time for reading blogs like yours and those of everyone who comments regularly on mine! Somewhere, there’s a balance….

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      • Aw thanks! I’ll be stopping by yours too. I think there has to be a balance too. I blog 4 days a week but most of my posts are between 200-500 words. I’ve seen people blog 3 times a week but post 2000 word posts. That’s a lot to read. I’ve learned to skim the long posts because I was spending 3+ hours a day just reading blogs.

        We want to support each other and also get more traffic to our blogs. I’m hoping I’ll find the right balance soon. What I do is reply to every comment and return a comment for every comment I receive. Then when I have extra time I go read other blogs and comment there too. But I’m working on keeping it to an hour a day. 🙂

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        • I definitely skim longer posts (+1000 words). I think they could be condensed or else split into two separate posts on different days. I think I’ve answered most comments from people, and I do try to leave the occasional one on blogs that aren’t part of my core. But I’d love to get down to one hour a day on them!

          Novels—those deserve most of my creative time! But here I am, catching up again! 🙂

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  12. great post. My blog has really helped me take an axe to writer’s block — but now, I don’t have time to write anything else! Well, for now, for me, the blog is enough. But in general, thinking about how to prioritize is great. thanks.

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    • Thanks! I wonder what my daily word count would be if I included comments on posts in my total!

      Prioritizing is hard. That’s why so many people have written how-to manuals, I think. Funny, if one or more of them really worked all the time, wouldn’t we all have our lives in order now?

      Thanks for commenting!

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  13. Kudos to you JM for focusing on your priorities! When I first began blogging last May, I became aware of people who blogged several times a day (I kid you not!) Um, no. Quality is much more desirable than quantity 🙂 This is why I post only once a week.

    One of the things that helped me keep up with the blogs I follow is I use a google reader. (I use feeddemon which can be found at feeddemon.com.) You can create folders to organize blogs into groups which is really great. When you log in, as new blog posts appear, they show up in bold print. I love this and it really simplifies keeping up with blogs that we really enjoy and it is a huge time saver too!

    Your on the right track, JM. This is one reader who is still here and hopes that you enjoy the liberation of focusing on your priorities brings. 🙂

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    • Oh yes, multiple posts a day. I run across some of those. I’ve been guilty a couple of times myself. And I recently vowed I would never do it again. Why? Because I usually don’t read multiple posts by one blogger in a day. So why was I doing the same thing? There can be good reasons for it, but sometimes it comes across as little more than a Facebook status update. And I don’t think that’s what a good blog should do.

      I’ll look into the google reader. Originally I was just following blogs through WordPress’s Follow button. But I think the “read blogs” feature sometimes glitches and doesn’t show them all. (I’ll get “wait, there’s more” messages that never result in more.) So I’ve been signing up for the email messages. But that sure fills the mailbox!

      I’m glad to see that people like you will stick with my scaled-back posts! Yesterday I got about 1,500 words written, and it really felt good. I’m hoping for more of the same today. 🙂

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      • Gosh, I just had to stick my head in here and say multiple posts a day–aargh! That is exactly like FB or Twitter and not meant for a blog. And many of them are just a reblog of someone else’s post, or a cut and paste from an article somewhere else. No substance, no point. I glaze right over them, too.
        *sticking head back out*

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        • LOL! I’ve got mixed feelings about the “reblog” option. It can be a good way to let more people know about a good post. But I think the reblogger should add some real personal content as to why the post was reblog-worthy. As I noted, I’ve sometimes posted an “extra” tidbit on a day. But I will not do it again!

          PS. I got two blog posts written today, so my scheduling is showing some short-term payoffs! Tonight will be a bit more backstory. 🙂

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  14. I wrote a post recently expressing similar sentiments too. I am seriously rethinking my daily blogging resolution. The past three months I have neglected a lot of things (some really important ones too) and was blogging instead. I am addicted to it and the Stats page gives me a high every time an invisible blogging milestone is surpassed. So I emphatise with you and wish you luck weening off this drug, called WordPress. 🙂 Cheers!

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  15. I totally relate to this! I moved from three posts a day down to two in the past few months, and it has been a much more sustainable pace. I was losing too much novel-writing time.

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    • Hi, thanks for the follow!

      Honestly, I can’t imagine posting once a day, let alone twice! I just don’t have that much “blog creativity” in me. So I need to focus on the novels, which will hopefully entertain some people beyond me and my family and friends. 🙂

      Looking forward to reading more posts on your blog!

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      • Oops–I meant three posts a week down to two a week! Sleep deprivation is taking its toll! I can’t imagine posting daily either–and I don’t have enough time to fully follow blogs that do.

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          • No kidding! I’m up with the baby every hour or two throughout the night right now (first colic now teething) so hopefully once I get a little more sleep I’ll catch those typos in my novel. For now I’m sure I’m just making more of them!

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  16. I think this is a wonderful idea. I told myself one day to “walk away from the stats” because I decided they were not the creative push I needed. It has crossed my mind that if we bloggers would all promise to limit our blog posts to some unknown but sustainable number, we’d all come out ahead–there would be fewer posts from great bloggers like you to keep up with. The reading and commenting part of blogging is so enjoyable but I have to be careful not to let the time that takes to get out of hand. Sounds like you have come up with a good plan to help you achieve the right balance–good luck!

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    • To quote Irene above, I agree with everything you wrote. 🙂

      The stats are so enticing, and that, of course, is part of their purpose. More posts usually correlate with more views, which feeds our egos and encourages us to post more frequently. But I can’t sustain that pace and maintain quality. And I want to maintain quality in the blog, but more importantly, in my novels. And I want those books to be well-received—no, they don’t have to be #1 bestsellers. But I’d like their audiences to enjoy them and want to see more.

      Now I wait for beta reader comments so I can get back to real work on them!

      Like

  17. Insightful post. There’s just so much time in the day. If you spend all your time blogging, are you gathering real experiences needed to nourish writing? Vacations are good – as well as homecomings. Will be watching for you.

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      • And the “like” thing is a puzzle. Sometimes there’s not time to write – but you want to tell the author the post is “worthy”…I like to touch base with my readers who visit, but it there’s just so much time available – and writing is the important thing …still trying to figure out how to graciously handle that – helps to see what other bloggers think and do…OK,thankx for reply and hasta later from here

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        • I will use the “like” button when I don’t have time to leave a comment. Like you, I want to let the author know that I was there and enjoyed what I read. But it doesn’t leave the same feeling of interaction as comments do. Dare I say again how I’d like to find the right balance?

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  18. The blog schedule’s a brilliant idea, I might have to snag that one. I keep getting messages to write more often, and I seem to only go in spurts, but knuckling down and committing to two or three specific days a week might be more productive.

    Thank you for the likes, though, you’re right– it gives you special warm fuzzies to earn feedback for posts. 🙂

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    • And I do try to comment, too! But sometimes there’s just not enough time in the day. But your posts are truly entertaining, enlightening, and interesting. You get to live and work and play in one of the most amazing cities I know. (So maybe I’m a little biased!) I’d bet a lot of people enjoy them.

      I think two to three times a week is fine. I know I’ve said this before, but it’s easier for me as a reader to keep up with fewer posts. But however often you do, I’ll be reading—and liking and commenting when I can. 🙂

      Like

  19. Pingback: On Blogs, Brands, and Romance | Christy Farmer

  20. Scheduling is great but I always find myself finding ways to get around it. I envy anyone who can always stay on task without getting distracted by another project (or something far less productive).

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    • I won’t lie and say it’s easy! It’s not. But the more I can do it, the better everything is that I do. That’s what I keep trying to remind myself. And if there are certain things we keep avoiding, we probably need to face the reality of why that is…. 😉

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  21. It’s so good to hear that others feel the same way – I’ve recently cut down to two posts a week, I couldn’t sustain any more without the rest of my writing suffering. And my partner. We don’t write in a vacuum – it’s important to support our followers too – but something has to give. Are we making rods for our own backs trying to do so much?

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    • There really are more important things in life than blogging (gasp! I hope WP doesn’t kick me out!). And this might sound like heresy, but there are also more important things than writing—like spending time with the people in our lives. While I love the interaction on the blogs, it has to be a lower priority than my personal life and my writing, which the blog is meant to support!

      Personally, I think everyone could cut down to 1-3 times per week. The quality would probably improve, and I don’t think too many people would complain that it’s not enough.

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  22. Stats rise and fall with the time devoted to them, but like 4am writer I find myself spending three hours a day to feel like a successful blogger. And when I don’t, I feel like I’ve squandered my progress. I’m going to let blogging time come and go in waves, otherwise I’ll never have anything but a blog to show for my time!

    I’ve noticed I can blog when I’m editing but not when I’m roughing…wonder why?

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    • And that 2-3 hours is just the blogging. How do people also handle Twitter, FB, and good grief now Pinterest? I just can’t do it. I wouldn’t get anything else done. I need time to work on the novels!

      And now that I’ve got my beta reader comments back on one novel, I have to plan out my revisions to it and then implement them. Social media just takes too much time! So sorry agents—for now I’m sticking to the blog, and that’s it!

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  23. “Honestly, I think fewer weekly posts will help me keep the content quality higher”

    Yes, quality is so important. I was just thinking how important it is to sculpt poetry rather than blurb it. Blurbing works sometimes perfectly, yet, the waiting for the words, for the perfect phrases to set them in, the intuitive feel of “Yes!” before I let go –

    You further confirmed that thought. thanks!

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    • Hi, thanks for joining in and the follow! I’m still trying to catch up with new bloggers like you who have found mine. I’ve said this in other comments, but I’m a firm believer in quality over quantity. I don’t know how many books or poems I will have in me, but I want them to be as good as I can write them.

      And given the constraints of daily life, that means I can’t be posting here everyday. I admire those who can do it well, but I need to devote time to other duties—and the writing Muse.

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      • I understand the whole give and take blog thing, yet, Even if Billy Collins posted a poem a day, I might get tired of reading, and I am sure he would get tired of reading mine. lol!

        Please don’t feel obligated, likes and comments come shy of a publishing offer and blogging allows us a faceless audience to motivate us to be less than isolated writers but more so practitioners of a craft we love and are dedicated the perfect and fulfill. the priority is to create, polish, fulfill the expressionist in yourself and all the “Likes” in the world can’t do that for you —

        I believe it was Miles Davis describing the phases of a musician as first learning the notes and how to access them fluently, then developing a style of phrasing, acquiring the chops (Writing-The voice), and the last phase is what takes a life time – perfecting, refining, the voice of your expression to heavenly satisfaction.

        We all have to commit to the different phases with dedication and sacrifice in order to see the pay-offs. Otherwise we become none more than what I call the Venice Beach artist. lol!

        Please be assured, I get it. One totally sincere “Like” is beter than 50 “I was here likes” 🙂

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